State security agents swarmed Beitbridge Border Post yesterday ahead of President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s visit tomorrow to officiate at the upgrading of country’s busiest port.

The heavy presence of police, soldiers and spy agents follows recent security breaches in Harare, Gweru and lately Bulawayo, where the Zanu PF leader narrowly escaped a bomb explosion, which later killed two of his deputies’ aides and injured 47 top party and government officials.

Border control officials yesterday have had their parking temporarily moved to another site far away from the spot where the ground-breaking ceremony will be held as security agents enhanced their checks.

“We have instructions to scrutinise and be strict. We cannot make a mistake,” an immigration hand at three security points introduced specifically for Mnangagwa’s visit said.

A busload of plain clothes men, suspected to be security agents, also arrived in Beitbridge and inspected the two venues Mnangagwa is expected to visit.

He is expected to address a political rally at Dulivhadzimo Stadium after the visit at the border post.

The Beitbridge border post is undergoing a $100 million facelift expected to ease traffic flow.

Beitbridge was awash with all-terrain vehicles, many of which were driven by men in army apparel.

A Zanu PF truck carrying a refined public address system went round Beitbridge blasting the popular Jah Prayzah hit song Kutonga Kwaro, synonymous with the November uprising that ended former President Robert Mugabe’s rule.

Meanwhile, Mnangagwa yesterday launched the Zimbabwe National Geospatial and Space Agency (Zingsa), Zimbabwe National Qualifications Framework and the Zimbabwe National Critical Skills Audit report in Harare.

Zingsa, which is being spearheaded by the Higher and Tertiary Education ministry, seeks to advance geospatial science, earth observation and satellite communication systems.

The use of satellite technology is expected to unlock cutting-edge solutions in health, agriculture, mineral exploration, disaster management and the water management sectors.

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